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Welcome!

This website is currently under construction.

Please feel free to have a look around, but be aware that there are many broken links (missing pages) and unfinished pages. We’ve also noticed that a lot of our links, to pages on this website are actually opening new tabs, which is really annoying. Sorry about that! We are on the case 🙂

It’s a work in progress.

Constructive criticism is welcome 🙂

Winwaloe and Piran

winwaloe

Two Cornish saints are commemorated this week – St Winwaloe on March 3rd, and St Piran on 5th March.

Winwaloe is often called a Breton saint as he lived there and founded churches in Brittany. However, his parents were Cornish and moved to Brittany to escape a plague.

He did return to found church communities in Cornwall.

Winawaloe is also known for founding churches in various places in England and Wales.

Piran is venerated as the patron saint of Cornwall (and of tin miners), and the Cornish flag is the flag of St Piran.

If you are interested to discover more about Cornish saints, take a look here.

Gool Peran Lowen, as they say in Cornish!

goolperan

Rooted and Grounded


Kernow Community was created in the spring of 2014, born out of a dream and a passion for authentic community based on the Celtic monastic tradition with a vision to honour and explore the ‘ancient paths’.

The pages seemed to pour out of me as though I were inspired…

…and then nothing happened.

I expected local believers here in Cornwall to be immediately on board but despite my prayers and efforts,   there was no interest at all. Local priests and pastors looked, but showed no interest. Even my eldest son who was enthusiastic at the beginning lost his passion as he became increasingly physically and mentally unwell.

And so began for me a season of waiting and learning hard lessons of trust and obedience and patience while various aspects of my life seemed to crumble around me.

Just this week I have been praying and asking God whether He has a purpose for Kernow community or whether I, like my friend (see the most recent blog post – Questioning the vision) mis-heard or misunderstood the call.

I would be very happy for you to journey alongside me.

You must be aware though that Kernow community is very far from being an established community – although it is certainly still my dream and desire that it should grow to be established to be a blessing to all.

But at this stage it is still just a dream, a hope, a kernel of a seed. Perhaps if we water it with our prayers (and tears), God will give the increase.

This now is my prayer for you, from Ephesians 3:14-21

Ephesians 3:14-20King James Version (KJV)

14 For this cause I bow my knees unto the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, 

15 Of whom the whole family in heaven and earth is named,

16 That he would grant you, according to the riches of his glory, to be strengthened with might by his Spirit in the inner man;

17 That Christ may dwell in your hearts by faith; that ye, being rooted and grounded in love,

18 May be able to comprehend with all saints what is the breadth, and length, and depth, and height;

19 And to know the love of Christ, which passeth knowledge, that ye might be filled with all the fulness of God.

20 Now unto him that is able to do exceeding abundantly above all that we ask or think, according to the power that worketh in us, to him be glory in the church and in Christ Jesus throughout all generations, for ever and ever! Amen.

Shoshana 

Questioning the Vision

I’m reposting this from my personal blog.

Life for Beginners

I had some disappointing news this week. I can’t name names as I’m not sure whether or not it’s fully official yet – nothing has been posted on the website, but members have been emailed – an online dispersed monastic community with which I have been associated, has closed its virtual doors.

The leader of the community had decided, after prayer and soul-searching, that her vision to create an online community was not truly of God.

The call that my friend believes she had heard from God was a call to adopt the monastic habit, but in an effort to heed that call she had misinterpreted it to include becoming ordained, and the setting up of an online community.

Neither of those things, she said, were truly part of her original call, she realised now.

Since the creation of an online community was not God’s idea but her own aberration…

View original post 510 more words

Week of Prayer for Christian Unity

salt

Every year at this time, Christians are reminded of Jesus’ prayer for his disciples and, by extension, all Christians and followers of Jesus today:

“That they may all be one; even as You, Father, are in Me and I in You, that they also may be in Us, so that the world may believe that You sent Me.” – John 17:21

… and invited to pray for the Unity of the Christian Church as a witness to the World of the love of Jesus for them.

My parents were brought up to be hardline protestants who viewed the Roman Catholic church as the arch-enemy, and they were appalled at the idea of ecumenicism, believing it to be some kind of nefarious plot of the devil to “mix truth with error”, and they looked with horror at the spectre of some future “One World Church” with the Pope as head, and government-controlled and sanctioned beliefs.

I’m still a protestant (which essentially means that I do not accept the authority of the Roman Catholic church over the whole church), but I have grown to respect and appreciate much about the Catholic and Orthodox churches. I count many Roman Catholics as my closest friends. I can see beauty and meaning in a lot of the things that my traditions have rejected.

I don’t necessarily agree with everything that I learn though of course.

But actually, ecumenicism isn’t about joining together to throw off doctrine so we can fully agree with each other – I think that, if we did, we would all be poorer, with a wishy-washy, watered down version of the faith that ends up having less power and impact because of it.

No. In fact, we don’t need to agree with each other. We don’t even really need to fully understand each other.

What we do need to do, however, is to love each other.

“By this all men will know that ye are my disciples – that ye love one another.”

Of course, understanding may help, and so Kernow Community is my humble attempt to invite people – Christians and non-Christians – whatever your background or denomination, who are interested in looking at the roots of our faith, to see where we have come from, how we have developed differently over the last 2000 years, and to learn to love and respect each other despite our differences.

week_of_prayer_logo_2016

Resources:

Resources for the Week of Prayer for Christian Unity can be downloaded from Churches Together in Britain & Ireland here.

From the World Council of Churches here.

From the Vatican here.

“Behold, how good and how pleasant it is For brothers to dwell together in unity!” – Psalm 133:1

The Gifts and Calling of God are Irrevocable

The Vatican released a document recently, called ‘The Gifts and Calling of God are Irrevocable’ on the subject of the Catholic church’s relationship with the Jewish people, Judaism and evangelism.

The media leapt on this news and reported it to have been saying that evangelism is not necessary, since the Jewish people have their own Covenant with God.

This article is a helpful clarification:

http://m.ncregister.com/blog/jimmy-akin/new-vatican-document-on-jews-salvation-and-evangelization/#ixzz3uQgjC3Ih

Does your church or denomination have an official doctrinal position on the subject of the Jewish people, Judaism and evangelism?

Does it have or support mission or mission organisations to the Jewish people?

Is it possible for a church or denomination to maintain friendly relationships with the Jewish people whilst simultaneously conducting missions to convert them?

What are your thoughts on the Vatican’s document and this clarification?

The Celtic Year

CelticYear

The Celtic Year by Shirley Toulson is a month-by-month list of Celtic saints with recommended ‘pilgrimages’ to make in every month.

It is put together in a peculiar arrangement of pagan seasons: Samhain, Imbolc, Beltane and Lammas.

But an unexpected delight in this book is the attention that the author has drawn attention to the fact that the very early Celtic church very much resembled the earliest, ancient Jewish Christian church, before it became influenced by more powerful forces.

Toulson also points out how the early pagan Celtic year resembled the Jewish year in many respects – a calendar based on the moon rather than the sun, counting the day from sunset to sunset rather than midnight to midnight, and the year from the autumn harvest instead of midwinter for example.

Additionally, the timing of the Celtic pagan festivals at the cross-quarter days, rather than the solstices and equinoxes of Anglo-Saxon and Roman paganism, are not far removed at all from the Jewish festivals. So when primitive Jewish Christianity came to Britain, as there is ample evidence it did, it would not have been an enormously difficult task to convert these pagan festivals to the new God of Christianity.

A nice, easy-to-read primer on the early Celtic church.

Shelach

For the past 12 weeks we have had very limited access to the internet. We’re in new premises, a brand new building that has yet to be connected to the phone line. Please join us in praying that this will be rectified very soon!

With all the major Christian festivals out of the way for this church year, we are back to Ordinary Time. But the Torah portions continue all year round, so now might be a good time to start looking at the weekly portions.

This week’s portion is Shelach, Send:

Shelach | שלח | “Send ”
Torah: Numbers 13:1-15:41
Prophets: Joshua 2:1-24
Gospel: Mark 10:1-45

Each portion consists of the main Torah reading, which is broken down into several readings (the Wikipedia entries for each portion are useful as they break them up into the individual aliyah readings https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shlach ), a portion from the prophets, or ‘haftarah’ and a suggested selection from the new testament, often called the B’rit Chadashah, or New Covenant. These vary and are not universally agreed upon. The selections in the Jewish New Testament suggest a selection that corresponds in theme to the Torah reading.

Shelach is the story of the spies, sent into the land of Canaan, who – with the exception of Joshua and Caleb – come back with a negative report.

See also: the Hebrew for Christians page http://www.hebrew4christians.com/Scripture/Parashah/Summaries/Shelach_Lekha/shelach_lekha.html

Married Monasticism

A lovely post about everyday monasticism for non-monastics.

http://ethikapolitika.org/2015/03/26/married-monasticism/

[As always, I haven’t checked the whole site and can’t vouch for everything in it, please use your own discernment]

The New Monasticism Gets Older, But Will it Grow Up?

This post is a year old, but I saw it for the first time today and thought it worth sharing.

“The New Monasticism Gets Older, But Will it Grow Up? by Greg Peters”
On Protestant, evangelical monasticism.

I thought this quote from John Henry Newman was particularly interesting:

“Clergymen at present are subject to the painful experience of losing the more religious portion of their flock. . . . They desire to be stricter than the mass of churchmen, and the church gives them no means.”

We prefer the word ‘spiritual’ over ‘religious’ these days, but the same is true nevertheless.

Does the longing for deeper devotion than the churches offer resonate with you?

http://www.firstthings.com/web-exclusives/2014/03/the-new-monasticism-gets-older

[The link above will take you away from us, as I haven’t figured out how to open a new tab via my mobile! So please do bookmark us before you go!]

Divine Mercy

This morning, I completely lost my temper. I was driving a bus-load of people (my children, actually) on a trip, and I lost my way, repeatedly. We may have been given the worst map ever created, but my total lack of a sense of direction probably played a part.

After the 16th* wrong turn, my patience – already wearing thin – completely ran out. There were tears. There was screaming and shouting, swearing and slamming of doors. It was all very Celtic, in fact. (I don’t have red hair for nothing!)

By the end of it, after I had traumatised my children and made myself thoroughly ashamed of my behaviour, we did actually arrive at our destination.

The proverbial ‘devil’ on one shoulder thoroughly condemned me, for being a bad driver, a bad parent, and a bad Christian, not at all qualified to guide anybody else through the disciplines!

Thankfully though, I didn’t need to listen to the voice of the little ‘devil’, as I know that God’s righteousness, perfection, peace and mercy is more than a match for my weakness and failures.

Today in the Roman Catholic calendar it is Divine Mercy Sunday, a feast upon which the sacrament of Confession is encouraged, and forgiveness promised.

In the evangelical tradition with which I am familiar, however, of course there is no sacramental confession to a priest, and we tend not to practice confession at all, but in the letter of St James, there is the admonition to confess our sins to one another:

“Therefore confess your sins to each other and pray for each other so that you may be healed. The prayer of a righteous person is powerful and effective.”
James 5:16 (NIV)

So I am confessing my sin and failure and weakness here to you and I ask that you would pray for me, so that I “may be healed” – of my anger and lack of self control (and poor sense of direction!).

The forgiveness that comes after confession makes us righteous, and so our prayers will be all the more effective.

May my Celtic temperament and passion be put to better use!

In the Name of the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. As it was in the beginning, is now, and shall be forever,
Amen.

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Divine_Mercy_Sunday
(Opens another tab – please bookmark us before you leave!)

*a random number, hopefully 16 is an exaggeration 🙂