The Gifts and Calling of God are Irrevocable

The Vatican released a document recently, called ‘The Gifts and Calling of God are Irrevocable’ on the subject of the Catholic church’s relationship with the Jewish people, Judaism and evangelism.

The media leapt on this news and reported it to have been saying that evangelism is not necessary, since the Jewish people have their own Covenant with God.

This article is a helpful clarification:

http://m.ncregister.com/blog/jimmy-akin/new-vatican-document-on-jews-salvation-and-evangelization/#ixzz3uQgjC3Ih

Does your church or denomination have an official doctrinal position on the subject of the Jewish people, Judaism and evangelism?

Does it have or support mission or mission organisations to the Jewish people?

Is it possible for a church or denomination to maintain friendly relationships with the Jewish people whilst simultaneously conducting missions to convert them?

What are your thoughts on the Vatican’s document and this clarification?

Shelach

For the past 12 weeks we have had very limited access to the internet. We’re in new premises, a brand new building that has yet to be connected to the phone line. Please join us in praying that this will be rectified very soon!

With all the major Christian festivals out of the way for this church year, we are back to Ordinary Time. But the Torah portions continue all year round, so now might be a good time to start looking at the weekly portions.

This week’s portion is Shelach, Send:

Shelach | שלח | “Send ”
Torah: Numbers 13:1-15:41
Prophets: Joshua 2:1-24
Gospel: Mark 10:1-45

Each portion consists of the main Torah reading, which is broken down into several readings (the Wikipedia entries for each portion are useful as they break them up into the individual aliyah readings https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shlach ), a portion from the prophets, or ‘haftarah’ and a suggested selection from the new testament, often called the B’rit Chadashah, or New Covenant. These vary and are not universally agreed upon. The selections in the Jewish New Testament suggest a selection that corresponds in theme to the Torah reading.

Shelach is the story of the spies, sent into the land of Canaan, who – with the exception of Joshua and Caleb – come back with a negative report.

See also: the Hebrew for Christians page http://www.hebrew4christians.com/Scripture/Parashah/Summaries/Shelach_Lekha/shelach_lekha.html

Early Jewish Believers’ View of Jesus

Looking at the Creeds, which determine the nature and essence of God, putting God into a box that we can understand, reveal a very Greco-Roman logical way of thinking, whereas the Jewish mind is accustomed to holding mystery and paradox in a tension without the need to explain every detail.

This post by Derek Leman on early
Jewish believers’ view of Jesus as God but reluctance to say so in so many words is interesting, and we look forward to reading his new book when it comes out.

http://www.derekleman.com/musings/careful-but-confusing-language-about-yeshua-as-divine-messiah/